THE VIOGNIER "VEE-OWN-YAY" WINE

THE VIOGNIER "VEE-OWN-YAY" WINE

THE VIOGNIER "VEE-OWN-YAY" WINE

Viognier (“Vee-own-yay”) is a much popular full-bodied wine and has its roots in southern France. The wine is famous for its aromas of tangerine, peach, and honeysuckle. The wine can also be oak-aged to add a rich and creamy taste. If you are bold wine enthusiast, who brood over bold white wines, then you will definitely like Viognier wine. Vee-own-yay is the wine for those people who love dominant aromas. This wine ranges taste from lighter flavors of mango, tangerines, and honeysuckle to creamier notes of vanilla mixed with spicy clove and nutmegs. Depending on the manufacturer and method used to produce, Viognier will range in intensity from bold and creamy to light and spritzy. This wine will be dry on the palate; even though some of the producers make off-dry styled ones that highlight the peachy aromas of the wine. These wines are noted for an oily sensation that is provided by the grape used to make this wine. The drier styles of the wine are less fruity on the palate and offer subtle bitterness. Viognier Selection • If you love the floral notes of the wine, you can go for Torrontés from Argentina, dry Moscatel from Portugal and dry styles of Müller Thurgau. • If you are lover of the richness offered by creamy oaked Viognier, oak-aged versions will be best for you. You can go for Roussanne, Chardonnay, Trebbiano, and Marsanne as well. Viognier Food Pairings While pairing foods with Viognier, you will need to respect the medium acidity and delicate floral notes of the wine. The rule of thumb is to expand and embellish the core flavors of the drink while making sure that the foods you pair with it are not too bold or acidic. An example can be matching Viognier from Paso Robles with chicken tagine that has almonds and apricots served with saffron rice. Yet again, you should keep in mind that the food you select should enhance the creaminess and fruity flavors of the drink. You will need to spend seventeen to twenty five dollars to have a good bottle of Viognier from South Australia and California, where the price for a decent Viognier from Rhone valley of France or an excellent one from United States or South Australia can go up to forty plus dollars.